My mistress eyes sonnet. Shakespeare Sonnet 130 2019-03-04

My mistress eyes sonnet Rating: 5,6/10 389 reviews

SparkNotes: Shakespeare’s Sonnets: Sonnet 130

my mistress eyes sonnet

This line could only describe a perfect woman if that woman happened to be white. But, if you think sappy love poems are ridiculous, you're not alone — that's pretty much how felt too, and he spends these fourteen lines ripping that kind of poem apart. Unfortunately, it just makes her sound uglier. There's a pretty interesting bit about her on. There have been a number of attempts to identify the Dark Lady, however none have some to fruition. So this is just one more way the speaker scrambles our expectations. I think so, and so I like the sonnet : Thanks for reminding me of the wonderful Sting album! Shakespeare uses reeks often in his serious work, which illustrates the modern meaning of the word was common.

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Analysis Of The Poem ' My Mistress ' Eyes Are Nothing Like The...

my mistress eyes sonnet

The ideal woman in a poem probably isn't supposed to smell at all, unless she smells like perfume. With his share of the income from the Globe, Shakespeare was able to purchase New Place, his home in Stratford. These numbers come from the order in which the poems were first published in 1609. Love then ceases to be intent on appearances and focuses on character. The conflict between these two feelings is never fully resolved. He does mention her breasts line 3 , but in general this is pretty family-friendly love poetry. That line in particular seems almost openly satirizing the tradition itself, as it is well known that many Elizabethan poets would compare their lovers to things that mortals could not achieve, leaving the realm of human to enter the pantheon of the gods.

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Shakespeare Sonnet 130: My Mistress' Eyes Are Nothing Like The Sun

my mistress eyes sonnet

This particular sonnet gives a really nice example of the turn. Here though, the mistress's hair is compared to black wires sticking out of the top of her head. The iron spikes reinforce this delineation, drawing in thought with respect to the gathering 's merciless judgements and reformatory character. He makes it clear that her appearance isn't crucial, but most of his positive feelings about her remain a mystery. The face and features of Shakespeare as 'imaged' in that portrait are those with which his readers are probably most familiar. This woman's skin isn't white, or even cream colored.

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Analysis of Sonnet 130 by William Shakespeare

my mistress eyes sonnet

In telling his mistress that he loves her, our speaker also has to give us an idea about what his love is like. The sonnet is generally considered a humorous parody of the typical love sonnet. Contemporary poets, such as Sidney and Watson, would use the Petrarchan sonnet for its poetic form, whereas in Sonnet 130, Shakespeare mocks all the conventions of it. Shakespeare uses figurative language by using criticizing hyperboles to mock the traditional love sonnet. He loves this particular woman even though she can't begin to measure up to the perfection of a goddess. Lines 13-14 And yet, by heaven, I think my love as rare · As any she belied with false compare. It makes women into goddesses, not real human beings.

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Shakespeare Sonnet 130

my mistress eyes sonnet

The York and Lancaster rose is red and white streaked, symbolic of the union of the Red Rose of Lancaster and the White Rose of York. And yet, by heaven, I think that my love is as unique as any woman who is the subject of a romantic poem. I love to hear her speak, yet well I know That music hath a far more pleasing sound; I grant I never saw a goddess go; My mistress, when she walks, treads on the ground: And yet, by heaven, I think my love as rare As any she belied with false compare. The point is the same as in the earlier lines. . Was this sonnet, in fact, the first complaint against the fashion industry of poetry creating unrealistic images of women which simply could not be met by most women? In Sonnet 130, there is no use of grandiose metaphor or allusion; he does not compare his love to Venus, there is no evocation to Morpheus, etc. Instead of a woman who smells like a rose, he gives us a woman who smells bad.

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Shakespeare’s Sonnets Sonnet 130

my mistress eyes sonnet

But we're not fans of lame clichés, and we think it's pretty fun to watch Shakespeare go to town on them in this sonnet. Shakespeare utilizes a new structure, through which the straightforward theme of his lover's simplicity can be developed in the three quatrains and neatly concluded in the final couplet. I grant I never saw a goddess go; I've never seen a goddess walk; My mistress, when she walks, treads on the ground: But I know that my mistress walks only on the ground. This poem is understood through figurative language such as metaphor or simile and hyperbole, and through poetic devices such as allusion and Imagery. Plus, comparing a normal woman to a goddess is a complete exaggeration or hyperbole as we English literature folks like to say , and that's exactly what this poem is trying to get us away from.

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Shakespeare Sonnet 130 Analysis: My mistress' eyes are nothing like (...)

my mistress eyes sonnet

That makes up for her lacking artistry. In his poems and plays, Shakespeare invented thousands of words, often combining or contorting Latin, French, and native roots. What would it look like without all the negative comparisons? The Way She Moves… Symbol Analysis Of course this perfect woman that the speaker is taking apart would have to be as graceful as an angel too. Shakespeare's My Mistress' Eyes Are Nothing Like the Sun Many authors compose sonnets about women whom they loved. But Shakespeare ends the sonnet by proclaiming his love for his mistress despite her lack of adornment, so he does finally embrace the fundamental theme in Petrarch's sonnets: total and consuming love. In Sonnet 130, there is no use of grandiose metaphor or allusion; he does not compare his love to Venus, there is no evocation to Morpheus, etc.

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Sonnet 130: My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun

my mistress eyes sonnet

I love to hear her speak, yet well I know That music hath a far more pleasing sound: I grant I never saw a goddess go, My mistress, when she walks, treads on the ground: And yet by heaven, I think my love as rare, As any she belied with false compare. Analysis: Sex Rating Exactly how steamy is this poem? He loves her for what the reality is, and not because he can compare her to beautiful things. As time has passed, language has evolved along with culture, and consequently gained different connotations. Shakespeare doesn't say anything about this woman's race, but with her black hair and dark skin, we can definitely tell that she doesn't look like a Barbie doll. Her Voice Symbol Analysis Just a couple more things to round out the list.

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