Catcher and the rye themes. Themes 2019-01-09

Catcher and the rye themes Rating: 5,6/10 344 reviews

Major Themes

catcher and the rye themes

It deals heavily with the loss of the innocence of childhood and having to grow up. The artists have sold out — for money or fame or just for applause. He envies someone like Stradlater, who can simply pick up girls whenever he likes, and who treats sex as a casual pleasure. The hunting hat that Holden purchased early in the novel is a symbol of his isolation. The fall from the cliff represents the fall from innocence. Salinger, The Catcher in the Rye, Ch.

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The Theme of Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger Essay

catcher and the rye themes

He cannot have it with girls he likes, and he cannot manage to numb himself enough to treat girls casually. Traumatized and made acutely aware of the fragility of life by his brother Allie's death, Holden is terrified by the idea of change and disappearance. The very title is about Holden wanting to save children from falling off a cliff. Perhaps Holden associates it with the innocence and purity he believes these characters represent and wears it as a way to connect to them. One of the primary themes in the novel is protecting the innocent.

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SparkNotes: The Catcher in the Rye: Themes

catcher and the rye themes

Holden mockingly says he has never seen a horse at Pencey. Loneliness Holden is very lonely, and his adolescent loneliness seems to run much deeper than the feelings so commonly felt at that age. The first character he mentions is his brother D. He impossibly tries to avoid pains that are inevitable for human mortals while they live. His journey is an unpleasant and difficult one with many lessons learned along the way; including the realization that he is powerless to change the world. Salinger In the novel Catcher in the Rye by J.

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Key Themes & Symbols: The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger :: Homework Help and Answers :: Slader

catcher and the rye themes

They go to see a Broadway show and then go skating. Stradlater's anger at the description and Holden's subsequent ripping up of the composition serves as a reminder of Holden's isolation and his loss of childhood innocence. Holden… 862 Words 3 Pages The Catcher in the Rye a novel written by J. Of course, Holden himself is guilty of both these crimes. When Holden thinks that he will die soon or disappear soon, he speaks to the dead Allie. Holden explains to Phoebe that all he wants to be is the catcher in the rye.

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The Catcher in the Rye Study Guide from LitCharts

catcher and the rye themes

For Holden, the two schools are emblematic of a corrupt system designed by privileged adults and catering to boys who want to join their ranks. But although Holden expends so much energy searching for phoniness in others, he never directly observes his own phoniness. When the story begins, it starts while Holden is still at Pencey. Holden represents the attempt to shelter kids from growing up, and more personally, represents his desire to avoid the harshness of adult life. The events are related after the fact. As a result of harboring indignation over his brother's passing, Holden's actions fluctuate between moral and immoral. His attempt to connect with people fails and he realizes that he made a mistake in leaving school, and learns his lesson.

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The Catcher in the Rye

catcher and the rye themes

Loneliness is the emotional proof of the alienation Holden experiences; it is both a source of great pain and a source of his security. The ducks and the lagoon could represent many things, such as the fragility of life, which Holden worries about after the death of his brother, Allie. There are not too many characters in these few chapters but anyways the book gets more interesting while Holden gets in touch with more characters. Holden uses phoniness to describe things that are bad or wrong and this gives him a reason to alienate himself from others. The hat is outlandish, and it shows that Holden desires to be different from everyone around him. Do you happen to know, by any chance? Or unless you're with some girl that really knocks you out. Some adults even seem so selfish that they are willing to abuse children.

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Key Themes & Symbols: The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger :: Homework Help and Answers :: Slader

catcher and the rye themes

Themes Alienation: Holden uses alienation to protect himself from others. Throughout the novel, Holden seems to be excluded from and victimized by the world around him. At the same time, he is very self-conscious about the hat—he always mentions when he is wearing it, and he often doesn't wear it if he is going to be around people he knows. Holden appeared in some of those stories, even narrating one, but he was not as richly fleshed out in them as he would be in The Catcher in the Rye. His teacher gives Holden intelligent advice about getting his life back on track. He pretends to be an adult by drinking heavily, yet he complains like a child. It's no coincidence that the hat is the same color as Phoebe and Allie's hair.


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The Catcher in the Rye Themes

catcher and the rye themes

After failing out of… 1104 Words 4 Pages J. Some of it was pulled out of S. Even the advertisements for Pencey Prep are misleading. Holden is in some ways incredibly naive and innocent about worldly realities. He idealizes himself catching the children who would come to play in the rye field from falling from the cliff. D Salinger tells a story of a teenage boy named Holden Caulfield who gets kicked out from school to school.

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Themes

catcher and the rye themes

As his thoughts about the Museum of Natural History demonstrate, Holden fears change and is overwhelmed by complexity. Thinking about major themes can be helpful to the reader. Phoniness: Holden is always looking for the phoniness in others when he himself is the biggest phony. The hat is outlandish, and it shows that Holden desires to be different from everyone around him. Holden might see some romance in suicide and some comfort in the idea that it ends internal pain, but death does seem worse, the ultimate loneliness. He doesn't want to accept the world as it is, but he also feels powerless, unable to affect change.

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